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New Bible translation is written like a Hollywood screenplay

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POSTED: August 7, 2012 10:00 a.m.

NASHVILLE, Tenn.— A new Bible translation tackles the challenge of turning ancient Greek and Hebrew texts into modern American English and then adds a twist: It’s written like a screenplay.

Take the passage from Genesis in which God gets angry at Adam for eating the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil:

“Adam (pointing at the woman): It was she! The woman You gave me as a companion put the fruit in my hands, and I ate it.
“God (to the woman): What have you done?

“Eve: It was the serpent! He tricked me, and I ate.”

Later, Eve bears her first son, Cain.

“Eve (excited): Look, I have created a new human, a male child, with the help of the Eternal.”

Even people who have never read the Bible could probably guess that other translations don’t say Adam pointed his finger at Eve when he blamed her for his disobedience. Neither do other Bibles describe Eve as “excited” about her newborn son.

That’s pure Hollywood, but the team behind “The Voice” says it isn’t a gimmick. They hope this new version will help readers understand the meaning behind the sometimes archaic language of the Bible and enjoy the story enough to stick with it.

The idea was a longtime dream of Chris Seay, pastor of Houston’s Ecclesia Church. Seay had success in helping church members relate to the Bible by dividing out the parts of the various speakers and assigning roles to church members who read them aloud.

The idea struck a nerve with Frank Couch, the vice president of translation development for Nashville-based religious publisher Thomas Nelson, who had performed Bible-inspired sketches on the streets of Berkeley, Calif., in his youth.

The result of their efforts, as well as a team of translators who worked alongside poets, writers and musicians, is “The Voice,” released in its full version earlier this year.

“The biggest thing, the unexpected plus, is that people will read an entire book of the Bible because it reads like a novel,” Couch said.

“It engages your imagination in a different way,” Seay said, expressing his hope that “The Voice” helps people to “fall in love with the story of the Bible.”

“The Voice” not only reformats the Bible but also inserts words and phrases into the text to clarify the action or smooth transitions. These words generally are in italics so the reader can tell what the additions are. At other points, the order of verses is changed to make the story read better.

Some earlier attempts to make the Bible accessible to a modern audience met with heavy criticism from people who thought the translators were taking too many liberties with the word of God, Wake Forest University religion professor Bill Leonard said. But those translators were attempting to deal with a real problem — increasing Bible illiteracy, even among those who attended church regularly, he said.

Eugene Peterson, translator of the popular “The Message” Bible, published in 1993, said he was braced for the negative reaction faced by some of his predecessors, but they didn’t materialize.

“I was surprised that the reception was so immediate and so positive,” he said. “...I think the one thing I hear most often is, ‘This is the first time in my life I understood the Bible.’”

 

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