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PSC OKs two new reactors near Augusta

ATLANTA - Georgia Power won approval Tuesday from the state Public Service Commission to build two new nuclear reactors near Augusta, which could be the first new nuclear project to break ground in the country in three decades.

The $14 billion expansion project at Plant Vogtle is set to begin construction in 2011 and is scheduled to be completed in 2017. The PSC voted 4-1 Tuesday to certify the proposal from Georgia Power, a subsidiary of Southern Co. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission must also sign off.

March 17, 2009 | By Shannon McCaffrey Associated Press writer | State, National


Crowds gathering for Savannah parade

SAVANNAH - Thousands of gaudy green revelers are filling Savannah's downtown historic district for St. Patrick's Day - the coastal city's biggest celebration of the year.

Overnight rains had dispersed by Tuesday morning before the city's mammoth parade kicked off, as masses of residents and tourists clad head-to-toe in green crammed the sidewalks and the oak- shaded squares.

March 17, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Woman charged with shooting daughter

SAVANNAH - A Savannah woman was charged Monday with shooting and wounding her 11-year-old daughter as she slept in bed, just a few weeks after the mother's boyfriend reported to police she attacked him with a knife in her hand.

Mary Elizabeth Frazier, 35, was being held in the Chatham County jail on an aggravated assault charge. Police said she also underwent a mental evaluation because she has a history of mental illness.

March 17, 2009 | By Russ Bynum Associated Press writer | State, National


Benning soldier shot dead in Brunswick

BRUNSWICK - Brunswick police are investigating the shooting death of a Fort Benning soldier.

The body of 23-year-old Army Spc. Antonio L. Weems of Ventura, Calif., was found Saturday night in a car parked on a street corner. Police say Weems was killed by a gunshot to the head.

March 09, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Killer faces execution for island murder

ATLANTA - A man scheduled to be put to death Tuesday for the murder of a female neighbor who spurned his advances has asked a state panel to spare his life.

Robert Newland was convicted in 1987 and sentenced to die for the slaying of Carol Sanders Beatty, 27, a former state and national amateur diving champion who was killed in the garden of her St. Simons Island home.

March 09, 2009 | By Greg Bluestein Associated Press writer | State, National


Senate resolution targets tax-delinquent lawmakers

ATLANTA (AP) - Georgia legislators who don't pay their taxes on time would face sanctions or ouster under a measure the state Senate could soon consider.

The proposal comes after a report by the Department of Revenue revealed 22 lawmakers from both chambers - about 10 percent of state legislators - are delinquent on their tax bills, some owing money from as far back as 2002. Sponsor Sen. Eric Johnson said the measure was meant to target the "serial abusers" who knowingly don't pay their taxes.

March 05, 2009 | By Greg Bluestein Associated Press writer | State, National


One Sunday-sales proposal dries up

ATLANTA (AP) - The sponsor of a bill that would open the door for Georgia stores to sell alcohol on Sundays withdrew the measure on Wednesday just before a state Senate panel vote.

State Sen. Seth Harp said he didn't have the votes to push his legislation in the Senate Regulated Industries and Utilities Committee.

March 05, 2009 | By Shannon McCaffrey Associated Press writer | State, National


State House kills homestead exemption hike

ATLANTA - The House has failed to adopt a measure that would have doubled the homestead exemption from $2,000 to $4,000.

The proposal, which has already passed the Senate, did not reach the two-thirds majority of the vote needed to pass the House. Supporters quickly moved to reconsider the plan, meaning it could come to another vote Thursday.

March 05, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Former judge pleads to fraud charge

SAVANNAH - A former Court judge pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday to a charge that he illegally accepted a $42,500-a-year political appointment to settle unpaid attorneys fees owed to him by the Superior Court judge who gave him the job.

Homerville attorney Berrien Sutton, who resigned as a Clinch County judge last year, pleaded guilty to a single count of conspiracy to commit honest services fraud before U.S. District Judge Hugh Lawson in Macon.

March 05, 2009 | By Russ Bynum Associated Press writer | State, National


Perdue slashes budget yet again

ATLANTA - Gov. Sonny Perdue said Tuesday he will draw on more than $1 billion in federal stimulus dollars to help the state dig out of a deepening deficit for the coming fiscal year.

Beset by plummeting tax collections, Perdue ordered deep new cuts Tuesday to state spending. But he allowed that the financial picture would have been far worse without the federal dollars coming from Washington.

March 04, 2009 | By Shannon McCaffrey Associated Press writer | State, National


Much of Georgia gets rare snow day

ATLANTA - Students and teachers across central Georgia welcomed a snow day Monday after winter weather blanketed the state on the first day of March.

The rare March snowstorm closed schools, caused traffic accidents, canceled church services and knocked out electricity to thousands of homes as it moved across Georgia on Sunday. Authorities reported no fatalities or serious injuries from the ice and snow, which sent trees crashing across roadways and onto power lines.

March 02, 2009 | By Dorie Turner Associated Press writer | State, National


DoT board fires commissioner

ATLANTA - The Georgia Transportation Board voted 9-3 Thursday to fire Commissioner Gena Evans, citing a need for a change at the department troubled by criticism of its leadership and prompting a rebuke from Gov. Sonny Perdue.

The board named department chief engineer Gerald Ross interim commissioner and said it will soon begin a national search for a replacement.

February 27, 2009 | By Dionne Walker Associated Press writer | State, National


Congress allocats money for Intracoastal

WASHINGTON, DC - In directing nearly $1 million in funding for Georgia's portion of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Congress affirmed a recent study by the University of Georgia's Carl Vinson Institute that the channel is essential to Coastal Georgia's economy. Congressman Jack Kingston (R/GA-1), who helped secure the funding, says it will be used to alleviate silting which has caused transit boaters to avoid the area.

"Coastal Georgia has been losing lots of revenue as transit boaters bypass us on the way to Florida," Congressman Kingston said. "If you're moving your yacht from New York to ...

February 27, 2009 | Special to the Courier | State, National


Execution set for 1986 St. Simons murder

ATLANTA - The Georgia attorney general's office says the execution of a man convicted in the 1986 fatal stabbing of a St. Simons woman has been scheduled for March 10.

The attorney general's office says Robert Newland will be executed by lethal injection at the Georgia Diagnostic and Classification Prison in Jackson. He was convicted and sentenced to die in 1987 for the fatal stabbing of his neighbor, 27-year-old Carol Sanders Beatty. She was killed in the garden of her home.

February 26, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


House panel OKs $18.9 billion budget

ATLANTA - Grappling with the worst deficit in Georgia's history, the House budget-writing panel on Wednesday approved an $18.9 billion spending plan that funnels hundreds of millions of dollars in federal stimulus money into Medicaid and education.

Plummeting state tax collections have ripped a giant hole in the state's revenues. The budget approved on Wednesday by a voice vote in the House Appropriations Committee slashes $2.6 billion in state revenues for the current fiscal year.

February 25, 2009 | By Shannon McCaffrey Associated Press writer | State, National


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Page 83 of 101

Articles by Section - State, National


Bill Clinton at the UN applauds Ebola success

“As of today, I am officially Ebola free,” declared former President Bill Clinton before the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC). Clinton recently visited Liberia, but he arrived three days before the country was officially declared free of the Ebola virus (May 9), and so he had to go through all the official protocols to be sure he was Ebola free before being allowed in public.

May 29, 2015 | Susan Roylance Deseret News | State, National


Car-centric cities leave the poor in the dust

A lot of things make it easier to get a job — education, experience, networks — but one of the biggest factors is just how easy, or difficult, it is for a person to get around.

May 27, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


What happens if you give some families global aid and some families nothing?

The idea of global aid — giving a family a cow, or chickens, or micro-credit loans to start a small business — sounds like a good idea. But Dean Karlan wanted to know if it really works.

May 26, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Are schools preparing students for the new workforce?

Will there be jobs for college grads in the future — and if so, which jobs?

May 26, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


6 reasons adults of all ages need to be thinking about Social Security

Most people rarely think about Social Security before age 60. That is unfortunate, because many workers need Social Security benefits long before they reach retirement. Also, calculations that determine benefit amounts are based on a person’s complete work history, often extending back to part-time jobs in high school or college.

May 22, 2015 | Flint Stephens KSL | State, National


Pay-as-you-go schooling might not be an option for college students any more

In the grand tradition of summer jobs, many of America's freshly minted high school grads will pick up work flipping burgers and delivering pizzas this summer. But it's unlikely that those jobs will come close to paying tuition in the fall.

May 15, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


How automation of "routine' jobs is making it harder to bounce back from recession

The American labor market was once built on routine work -- jobs in factories and offices that required human bodies to perform repetitive tasks, whether it was stamping widgets or making phone calls.

May 15, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Does it matter where you go to college?

This month, high school kids across America will throw their caps in the air with an eye toward college in the fall. Many will head to community colleges and state schools around the country, and a select few will head to the country's elite campuses. But does it really matter where you go to college?

May 14, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Statesboro area lawmaker is new majority leader

An office closer to the gold dome comes with the job of majority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives, so Rep. Jon Burns was in Atlanta Tuesday, moving his office contents from the second floor of the Capitol to the third.

May 13, 2015 | By Al Hackle Correspondent | State, National


One thing mothers around the world have in common

What do mothers in Tanzania have in common with mothers in America?

May 10, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


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