View Mobile Site

Archive By Section - State, National


Funding crisis looming for courts

ATLANTA - Georgia's top judge is weeks away from retiring, but first she must deal with a funding crisis that could bring the state's courts to a standstill.

Georgia Supreme Court Chief Justice Leah Ward Sears last week called Gov. Sonny Perdue's order to cut the funding for state agencies for the month of June "unconstitutional."

June 02, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


NCR bringing 2,000 jobs to state

ATLANTA - An ATM manufacturer is bringing 2,000 jobs to Georgia.

NCR Corporation is expected to announce plans to relocate its headquarters from Dayton, Ohio, at a news conference outside the capitol Tuesday. Gov. Sonny Perdue will be on hand to welcome the company to Georgia.

June 02, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Justice strikes down Georgia voting rule

ATLANTA - The Justice Department has rejected Georgia's system of checking whether prospective voters are citizens, a process that became the subject of a federal lawsuit in the weeks leading up to November's election.

In a letter released on Monday, the Justice Department said the state's voter verification program is frequently inaccurate and has a "discriminatory effect" on minority voters in Georgia.

June 01, 2009 | By Shannon McCaffrey Associated Press writer | State, National


Puerto Rican gets 105 years for killing Savannah woman

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - A Puerto Rico judge sentenced the son of a convicted killer to 105 years in prison Monday for the kidnapping, rape and murder of a pregnant Georgia tourist who made a desperate phone call to her fiance from the trunk of her assailant's car.

The judge imposed the sentence on Eliezer Marquez Navedo in a courtroom in Fajardo, the eastern coastal city where he ambushed Sara Kuszak in February while she jogged alone along a remote road. She was about five months pregnant.

June 01, 2009 | By David McFadden Associated Press writer | State, National


Cuts to hit Fort Morris hard

The Department of Natural Resources has named Fort Morris Historic Site in Sunbury to a list of state sites that will be forced to reduce hours and services because of a recent 39 percent reduction in state funds and a 24 percent projected loss of revenue.

May 29, 2009 | By Lauren Hunsberger Staff writer | State, National


Murder suspect fights extradition to Georgia

PHILIPSBURG, St. Maarten - The lawyer for a 26-year-old man accused of fatally shooting two young men in Georgia said Wednesday he will fight extradition because he believes his client will not receive a fair trial in the southern U.S. state.

Michael Registe is accused of the July 20, 2007 execution-style killings of two college students in Columbus, Georgia's third-largest city. His St. Maarten-based attorney, Remco Stomp, claims he would not be treated fairly in Georgia's courts because he is black.

May 28, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Budget woes keep museum empty

ATLANTA - Georgia hopes to turn the old World of Coca-Cola building into a fancy new state history museum, but the dire economy has put those plans on hold.

The state bought the building for $1 million after Coca-Cola left for a new museum two years ago. Gov. Sonny Perdue had tapped $15 million in his budget to renovate the site, which sits just a stone's throw from the state Capitol.

May 28, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Fort Morris facing steep cuts

ATLANTA - Georgia's parks are being hit with steep budget cuts that will hike fees and cause some sites to reduce their hours just as the summmer recreation season gets underway.

The plan includes keeping the colonial-era Fort Morris at Sunbury closed most days of the week. We'll have more on how the cuts will hit the east Liberty County attraction in Friday's Courier and on the Web after that.

May 27, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


State reopens I-16

Monday morning, Georgia DOT crews reopened the I-16 westbound travel lanes beginning at US 441 following damage to the State Route 257 bridge near Dublin.

May 25, 2009 | Special to the Courier | State, National


Truck wreck closes I-16

DUBLIN - The Georgia State Patrol says a tractor-trailer hauling a piece of equipment damaged an overpass on Interstate 16 West at Exit 49, forcing traffic to be diverted.

The Patrol said large chunks of concrete covered all of the westbound lanes Tuesday and officials said it likely will be months before the bridge is repaired.

May 21, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Charleston cedes 'most mannerly' to Savannah

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) - They've been rival Southern cities for 276 years, but Savannah and Charleston, S.C., aren't going to risk their courtly reputations by fighting over which one is "America's Most Mannerly City."

After a 12-year reign, Charleston officials have agreed with a survey's organizer that it has held the "Most Mannerly" title long enough, opting to cede it to its Colonial-era sister city on the Georgia coast.

May 21, 2009 | By Russ Bynum Associated Press | State, National


Holiday traffic expected to cause wrecks, some fatal

ATLANTA - The State Patrol is predicting a 29 percent increase in fatal traffic accidents in Georgia during the Memorial Day holiday weekend from 6 p.m. Friday to midnight Monday.

Troopers estimate 18 people will die and another 875 will be injured in 2,725 crashes.

May 21, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Officers shoot aggressive suspect in McIntosh County

DARIEN - A Townsend man was wounded Tuesday night after leading police on a high-speed chase through two counties.

May 13, 2009 | By Lewis Levine Correspondent | State, National


PSC changes its rules

ATLANTA (AP) - The State Public Service Commission has defied a 16-year-old state law by voting 3-2 to increase the tenure of its chairman to two years instead of the year set by law.

It then chose Stan Wise to serve in the post for two years beginning in July and voted to replace a state-mandated rotation system with one in which the PSC elects it chairman.

May 12, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Three states face off in water war

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) - A federal judge on Monday complained that a protracted battle over three states' claim to water flowing from a reservoir near Atlanta has been taking place in "never-never land."

U.S. District Judge Paul Manguson is attempting to unravel 19 years of litigation between Florida, Georgia and Alabama over water from Lake Lanier, Atlanta's water supply. Florida and Alabama want to increase the amount of water released from Lanier to benefit downstream power plants, farms and other businesses in their states.

May 12, 2009 | By Ron Word Associated Press writer | State, National


« First  « Prev  78 79 80 81 82  Next »  Last »

Page 80 of 101

Articles by Section - State, National


6 reasons adults of all ages need to be thinking about Social Security

Most people rarely think about Social Security before age 60. That is unfortunate, because many workers need Social Security benefits long before they reach retirement. Also, calculations that determine benefit amounts are based on a person’s complete work history, often extending back to part-time jobs in high school or college.

May 22, 2015 | Flint Stephens KSL | State, National


Pay-as-you-go schooling might not be an option for college students any more

In the grand tradition of summer jobs, many of America's freshly minted high school grads will pick up work flipping burgers and delivering pizzas this summer. But it's unlikely that those jobs will come close to paying tuition in the fall.

May 15, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


How automation of "routine' jobs is making it harder to bounce back from recession

The American labor market was once built on routine work -- jobs in factories and offices that required human bodies to perform repetitive tasks, whether it was stamping widgets or making phone calls.

May 15, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Does it matter where you go to college?

This month, high school kids across America will throw their caps in the air with an eye toward college in the fall. Many will head to community colleges and state schools around the country, and a select few will head to the country's elite campuses. But does it really matter where you go to college?

May 14, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Statesboro area lawmaker is new majority leader

An office closer to the gold dome comes with the job of majority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives, so Rep. Jon Burns was in Atlanta Tuesday, moving his office contents from the second floor of the Capitol to the third.

May 13, 2015 | By Al Hackle Correspondent | State, National


One thing mothers around the world have in common

What do mothers in Tanzania have in common with mothers in America?

May 10, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Governor comes out against pipeline

An Augusta television station is reporting that Gov. Nathan Deal has said the state will oppose plans by Kinder Morgan to bury a pipeline through Georgia, including Bryan and Liberty counties and the rest of the coast.

May 07, 2015 | Special to the Courier | State, National


Families struggle, comfort each other after Nepal earthquake

Adhikaar is a nonprofit advocacy group in Jackson Heights, Queens, one of New York's most diverse neighborhoods, and home to the majority of New York's estimated 40,000 Nepalese residents. Until last week, Adhikaar provided English lessons and worker's rights advocacy to about 1,000 Nepali women — mostly nannies and nail salon workers.

May 07, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Educators name Williams educator of year

The Georgia Association of Educators has named Rep. Al Williams, D-Midway, as its 2015 Legislator of the Year.

May 05, 2015 | Special to the Courier | State, National


1

Page 1 of 1


Please wait ...