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Archive By Section - State, National


Three states face off in water war

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) - A federal judge on Monday complained that a protracted battle over three states' claim to water flowing from a reservoir near Atlanta has been taking place in "never-never land."

U.S. District Judge Paul Manguson is attempting to unravel 19 years of litigation between Florida, Georgia and Alabama over water from Lake Lanier, Atlanta's water supply. Florida and Alabama want to increase the amount of water released from Lanier to benefit downstream power plants, farms and other businesses in their states.

May 12, 2009 | By Ron Word Associated Press writer | State, National


New law targets tas scofflaws in legislature

ATLANTA - Georgia lawmakers who fail to pay taxes could soon face sanctions from a legislative ethics committee.

Gov. Sonny Perdue signed the ethics bill into law on Tuesday.

May 07, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Perdue signs tax assessment freeze

ATLANTA - Property assessments in Georgia cannot rise until 2011 under a bill signed into law on Wednesday by Gov. Sonny Perdue.

Supporters say the new law will prevent local governments from hiking assessments during an economic downturn that has driven many property values down. But critics say it could lead counties and cities to boost millage rates instead, meaning tax bills will rise either way.

May 07, 2009 | By Shannon McCaffrey Associated Press writer | State, National


14-year-old dies in Savannah shootout

SAVANNAH - Savannah-Chatham police are investigating the shooting death of a 14-year-old boy.

The unnamed teen died in a rolling shootout that involved two vehicles.

May 06, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Perdue signs health agencies

ATLANTA - Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue has signed a bill that shakes up the state bureaucracy that oversees health and social service programs.

The new law restructures programs now handled by two state agencies, reshuffling them among three. The revamp includes a new Department of Behavioral Health to handle mental health and addictive disease programs.

May 05, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Perdue signs 'super speeder' bill

ATLANTA - Gov. Sonny Perdue is set to sign legislation that would slap Georgia drivers traveling well above the speed limit with stiff new fines.

The fines - expected to total about $23 million a year - are intended to help the state's cash-strapped network of trauma hospitals.

May 05, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Mosquito numbers prompt health emergency

ALBANY - Time to break out the bug spray and citronella candles across south Georgia counties.

Georgia health officials urged citizens Monday to take precautions because the mosquito population has grown dramatically in the wake of last month's heavy rainfall and flooding.

May 05, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Area senator running for governor

ATLANTA -- State Senator Eric Johnson of Savannah announced today that he will seek the Republican nomination for governor in 2010. Johnson intends to file paperwork for his candidacy tomorrow.

"As I traveled the state campaigning and visiting with Georgians from all walks of life, I was thrilled to see the support and encouragement we received in every corner of this state," said Johnson. "Georgians recognize that we need a steady, tested, and experienced leader to address the challenges we face as a state and to build on the progress we've made under Republican leadership. My vision for our future ...

April 27, 2009 | Special to the Courier | State, National


Vacant AG seat leads to frenzy

ATLANTA - The 2010 race for Georgia's attorney general is attracting almost as many candidates as the governor's contest - and for good reason. There hasn't been an open seat in the election for the state's top lawyer in more than 60 years.

That explains why what is normally considered a down-ticket race is already becoming one of the most hotly contested campaigns.

April 22, 2009 | By Greg Bluestein Associated Press writer | State, National


Bryan Co. teen gets 30 years for fatal wreck

Tam Duc Le has pleaded guilty to seven charges stemming from the March 21, 2007, deaths of three North Bryan teens in a car wreck,

April 22, 2009 | By Gina Sutherland Bryan County News | State, National


Sugar maker accuses whistleblower of faking warning

SAVANNAH - Attorneys for one of the nation's largest sugar producers accused a whistleblower Monday of faking a report that he says he sent to company executives warning them of the dust hazard at a Georgia refinery days before a blast there killed 14 workers.

Lawyers defending Imperial Sugar in more than 30 lawsuits filed a motion in Chatham County State Court asking a judge to throw out the report and all testimony by Graham H. Graham because he "knowingly provided false testimony." Graham was vice president of operations at the Texas company at the time of the explosion.

April 21, 2009 | By Russ Bynum Associated Press writer | State, National


GBI: Weapon examiner testing faulty

ATLANTA - The Georgia Bureau of Investigation says a state firearms examiner has resigned over faulty testing and dozens of criminal cases in the state could be in jeopardy.

GBI spokesman John Bankhead says Bernadette Davy admitted to not fully testing guns. She could not be reached for comment Monday after GBI announced she had resigned April 1. She had been an examiner since 1991.

April 21, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


Cagle drops from governor's race

ATLANTA - Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle fought back tears Wednesday as he reluctantly dropped out of the race for governor, saying he has a degenerative spine condition that will require surgery.

The surprise announcement immediately scrambled the crowded contest to replace Gov. Sonny Perdue when his second term expires in 2010. Cagle was considered a front-runner for the Republican nomination with the primary still more than one year away. The 43-year-old Republican from Gainesville said he will seek re-election as lieutenant governor.

April 15, 2009 | By Shannon McCaffrey Associated Press writer | State, National


Organization seeks volunteer weather watchers

The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, better known as CoCoRaHS, is looking for volunteers to help collect rainfall data across Georgia.

April 15, 2009 | Special to the Courier | State, National


New band of storms crossing Southeast

GAINESVILLE, Fla. - Another band of heavy storms is marching across the water-logged South.

A day after high winds were blamed for toppling trees that killed one person each in Tennessee and Georgia, more blustery conditions were reported late Monday and early Tuesday across the region.

April 14, 2009 | Associated Press | State, National


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Page 81 of 101

Articles by Section - State, National


Car-centric cities leave the poor in the dust

A lot of things make it easier to get a job — education, experience, networks — but one of the biggest factors is just how easy, or difficult, it is for a person to get around.

May 27, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


What happens if you give some families global aid and some families nothing?

The idea of global aid — giving a family a cow, or chickens, or micro-credit loans to start a small business — sounds like a good idea. But Dean Karlan wanted to know if it really works.

May 26, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Are schools preparing students for the new workforce?

Will there be jobs for college grads in the future — and if so, which jobs?

May 26, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


6 reasons adults of all ages need to be thinking about Social Security

Most people rarely think about Social Security before age 60. That is unfortunate, because many workers need Social Security benefits long before they reach retirement. Also, calculations that determine benefit amounts are based on a person’s complete work history, often extending back to part-time jobs in high school or college.

May 22, 2015 | Flint Stephens KSL | State, National


Pay-as-you-go schooling might not be an option for college students any more

In the grand tradition of summer jobs, many of America's freshly minted high school grads will pick up work flipping burgers and delivering pizzas this summer. But it's unlikely that those jobs will come close to paying tuition in the fall.

May 15, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


How automation of "routine' jobs is making it harder to bounce back from recession

The American labor market was once built on routine work -- jobs in factories and offices that required human bodies to perform repetitive tasks, whether it was stamping widgets or making phone calls.

May 15, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Does it matter where you go to college?

This month, high school kids across America will throw their caps in the air with an eye toward college in the fall. Many will head to community colleges and state schools around the country, and a select few will head to the country's elite campuses. But does it really matter where you go to college?

May 14, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Statesboro area lawmaker is new majority leader

An office closer to the gold dome comes with the job of majority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives, so Rep. Jon Burns was in Atlanta Tuesday, moving his office contents from the second floor of the Capitol to the third.

May 13, 2015 | By Al Hackle Correspondent | State, National


One thing mothers around the world have in common

What do mothers in Tanzania have in common with mothers in America?

May 10, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


Governor comes out against pipeline

An Augusta television station is reporting that Gov. Nathan Deal has said the state will oppose plans by Kinder Morgan to bury a pipeline through Georgia, including Bryan and Liberty counties and the rest of the coast.

May 07, 2015 | Special to the Courier | State, National


Families struggle, comfort each other after Nepal earthquake

Adhikaar is a nonprofit advocacy group in Jackson Heights, Queens, one of New York's most diverse neighborhoods, and home to the majority of New York's estimated 40,000 Nepalese residents. Until last week, Adhikaar provided English lessons and worker's rights advocacy to about 1,000 Nepali women — mostly nannies and nail salon workers.

May 07, 2015 | Lane Anderson Deseret News | State, National


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