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Archive By Section - Education


FPCA student excels at speaking

Public speaking often tops the list of people's biggest fears. First Presbyterian Christian Academy senior Joshua Rogers, however, isn't scared of performing under pressure. In fact, he excels in it.

December 25, 2008 | By Lauren Hunsberger Staff writer | Education


School bands perform at concert

The Long County School System recently held its annual Christmas concert at the Long County High School cafeteria, with director Myron Grimes leading the students.

December 24, 2008 | By Mike Riddle Coastal Courier correspondent | Education


Long County High School recognized by national magazine

Long County High School was recently recognized by U.S. News & World Report in its annual "America's Best High Schools" issue.

December 24, 2008 | By Mike Riddle | Education


U.S. kids improving in math, science

WASHINGTON - American schoolchildren do better than people think in math and science, but Asian students still dominate in math and have gained ground in science, an international study found.

Kids in the U.S. made significant gains in math since 1995 and score above average on international fourth- and eighth-grade tests in the subject, according to a study released Tuesday.

December 24, 2008 | By Libby Quaid AP education writer | Education


Long grade schoolers attend play

Recently, two third-grade classes from Ludowici's Smiley Elementary School went to Savannah to watch a play based on the Junie B. Jones books by Barbara Park.

December 20, 2008 | By Mike Riddle Correspondent | Education


Senate leader praises Joseph Martin for test scores

State Sen. Tommie Williams, R-Ga., visited Hinesville's Joseph Martin Elementary on Wednesday and spoke with teachers and staff, delivering mostly good news, and a touch of bad.

December 20, 2008 | By Lauren Hunsberger Staff writer | Education


Ga. college system approves higher student fees

ATLANTA - Georgia college students will pay more fees and employees will shell out hundreds more dollars for health care under stopgap budget measures passed by the state Board of Regents on Wednesday.

December 18, 2008 | The Associated Press | Education


Regents approve higher student fees

ATLANTA -- Georgia college students will pay more fees and employees will shell out hundreds more dollars for health care under stopgap budget measures passed by the state Board of Regents on Wednesday.

With little discussion, the board hurriedly approved the increases to help fill a $186 million hole created by state budget cuts. The university system already cut 6 percent, or $136 million, from this year's budget in October, but now the board is cutting another 2 percent, or $46 million, in anticipation of further reductions from the state.

December 18, 2008 | By Dorie Turner Associated Press writer | Education


Students' nursery rhyme play for holidays

You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen, Comet and Cupid, Donner, and Blitzen. But do you recall Jack Sprat, who ate no fat; his wife who ate no lean?

December 17, 2008 | By Deborah Starkey Special to the Courier | Education


Proposal to merge historically black colleges

ATLANTA - The head of Georgia's Senate Higher Education Committee is proposing a merger of two historically black colleges with other schools to save money.

December 16, 2008 | The Associated Press | Education


BoE keeps millage rate same

Rezoning, joint-education plans with Fort Stewart, and a decision on the recommended millage rate were among the items on the agenda at the Liberty County Board of Education monthly meeting on Nov. 18.

December 16, 2008 | By Lauren Hunsberger Staff writer | Education


School uniform policy getting mixed reviews

As Liberty County's two public high schools wrap up their first full semester since a uniform policy was instituted, the new clothing guidelines are receiving mixed reviews.

December 13, 2008 | By Lauren Hunsberger Staff writer | Education


Graduation rates up here, across state

Chris Teel refused to be another statistic.

December 11, 2008 | By Lauren Hunsberger Staff writer | Education


GSU president resigning

Bruce Grube has announced that he is stepping down as president of Georgia Southern University effective June 30, 2009.

December 09, 2008 | Statesboro Herald | Education


Lewis Frasier honors students of month

Lewis Frasier Middle School students of the Month were treated to lunch at Wendy's on Oct. 31.

December 06, 2008 | Staff Report | Education


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Articles by Section - Education


Test anxiety: How cold feet are ruining your grades

Hours of study and preparation seem to go out the window every time Katie Fisher sits down to take an exam.

March 29, 2015 | Mercedes White Deseret News | Education


Arkansas becomes the first state to mandate computer science offerings

Next school year, Arkansas will become the first state to require all public high schools and charter schools to offer classes in computer science, courtesy of a bill signed into law last month by Gov. Asa Hutchinson, reports Wired.

March 29, 2015 | Leslie Corbly Deseret News | Education


Don't snooze, you lose: how inadequate sleep holds students back

Sleep deprivation and college have gone hand-in-hand for decades. Pulling all-nighters, socializing, part-time jobs all combine to make sleep an inconvenience rather than a necessity.

March 27, 2015 | Leslie Corbly Deseret News | Education


Are student-athletes being cheated out of an education?

As March Madness ignites Americans' yearly obsession with college basketball games and broken brackets, a new book is calling attention to a different kind of madness: the systemic academic fraud at the center of college sports.

March 26, 2015 | Kelsey Dallas Deseret News | Education


Mayor essay contest open to sixth-graders

The city of Hinesville invites all sixth-grade students in Liberty County to participate in the "If I Were Mayor, I Would . . ." essay contest.

March 25, 2015 | Special to the Courier editor@coastalcourier.com | Education


Long PTO donates $7K to Smiley

The Long County Parent Teacher Organization recently presented a check for $7,000 to Smiley Elementary School Principal David Edwards during the group's meeting at SES.

March 25, 2015 | By Mike Riddle Coastal Courier correspondent | Education


Liberty FFA team places in Area 6 event

Five Liberty County High School FFA members recently competed in Area 6 career-development events at Ware County High School in Waycross

March 25, 2015 | Special to the Courier | Education


Sweet Briar College professors unanimously oppose school closing

When Sweet Briar College, a women's liberal arts school in rural Virginia, announced earlier this month that it was closing, many observers were surprised, as the college is still sitting on a sizable $85 million endowment.

March 25, 2015 | Eric Schulzke Deseret News | Education


Special-needs policies can be a tug-of-war for parents, teachers and administrators

Benay Josselson’s 7 1/2-year-old son, whom she describes as “high-functioning on the autistic spectrum,” is allowed to take breaks during class and, in certain classes, to use so-called fidget toys to help him focus. But in other classes at the Rockland County, New York, Jewish day school, teachers who find the "fidgets" distracting don't permit them.

March 24, 2015 | Menachem Wecker Deseret News | Education


Robot allows online teachers more personal connection with students

The Nexus Academy of Columbus is using robots to connect remote teachers from around the country with students at the school in Columbus, Ohio, according to Education News.

March 23, 2015 | Leslie Corbly Deseret News | Education


Rash of suicides leads MIT to rethink student pressure

After a rash of suicides the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, including four in the past year and two in the last month, the school has announced plans to lighten workloads and offer better social support.

March 23, 2015 | Eric Schulzke Deseret News | Education


Rash of suicides for MIT to rethink student pressure

After a rash of suicides the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, including four in the past year and two in the last month, the school has announced plans to lighten workloads and offer better social support.

March 23, 2015 | Eric Schulzke Deseret News | Education


Reading is much more decoding than letter and words

Daniel Willingham is a cognitive psychologist at the University of Virginia with a background in neuroscience who now focuses on education. He wrote a widely acclaimed 2010 book titled, “Why Don't Students Like School?” His new book, “Raising Kids Who Read,” off the presses this month, is an accessible hands-on guide for parents who want to help kids become avid readers at home and school. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

March 22, 2015 | Eric Schulzke Deseret News | Education


NYC mayor says no to plan to seize failing schools

The Democrat's internecine battle over education reform is ratcheting up in New York, as New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo continue to spar over how to reform the city's failing schools.

March 20, 2015 | Eric Schulzke Deseret News | Education


Long honors special ed teacher of year

The Long County Board of Education recently recognized Harriet Chapman as the school system's special-education teacher of the year. She received a plaque at a recent board meeting.

March 19, 2015 | Special to the Courier | Education


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